History

The history of postal service began the moment man felt the need to exchange information at a distance.
PREPHILATELIC ERA
Ancient Civilizations
The great empires of antiquity had their own internal postal services, which served solely to transmit orders and messages from the center to the periphery and then back again.
Roman Empire and the Middle Ages
The Roman postal network had 200,000 km of roads, which allowed for the extremely rapid circulation of information for the time: couriers could travel up to 270km in 24 hours. 
The First Postal Revolution
Starting from the communication needs of merchants, “ordinary couriers” were introduced, in addition, mail stations were introduced to change horses.
Between 1600 and 1700 the postal service began and was gradually nationalized, and postmarks were gradually introduced to be certain of the place of departure of the missive.
The Second Postal Revolution
In the late 1700s, fast mail carriages were introduced in France and the UK, which marked another 
The Third Postal Revolution
During the French Revolution, a state organization was given to the post office, which was able to cover the entire country, divided into territories of jurisdiction.
The importance of the mail and the information circle was now evident, so after a short time in the UK, a momentous innovation occurred that marked the transition from the prephilatelic era to the philatelic era.
Rowland Hill invented the world’s first postage stamp, this decreased postage costs by making it affordable for all British citizens to use the Post Office. 
On May 1, 1840, the world’s first postage stamp was put into circulation: the Penny Black.
Measuring 21.6 x 27 mm, it carried the effigy of Queen Victoria in profile facing right.
The history of postal service began the moment man felt the need to exchange information at a distance.
PREPHILATELIC ERA
Ancient Civilizations
The great empires of antiquity had their own internal postal services, which served solely to transmit orders and messages from the center to the periphery and then back again.
Roman Empire and the Middle Ages
The Roman postal network had 200,000 km of roads, which allowed for the extremely rapid circulation of information for the time: couriers could travel up to 270km in 24 hours.
The First Postal Revolution
Starting from the communication needs of merchants, “ordinary couriers” were introduced, in addition, mail stations were introduced to change horses.
Between 1600 and 1700 the postal service began and was gradually nationalized, and postmarks were gradually introduced to be certain of the place of departure of the missive.
The Second Postal Revolution
In the late 1700s, fast mail carriages were introduced in France and the UK, which marked another
The Third Postal Revolution
During the French Revolution, a state organization was given to the post office, which was able to cover the entire country, divided into territories of jurisdiction.
The importance of the mail and the information circle was now evident, so after a short time in the UK, a momentous innovation occurred that marked the transition from the prephilatelic era to the philatelic era.
Rowland Hill invented the world’s first postage stamp, this decreased postage costs by making it affordable for all British citizens to use the Post Office.
On May 1, 1840, the world’s first postage stamp was put into circulation: the Penny Black.
Measuring 21.6 x 27 mm, it carried the effigy of Queen Victoria in profile facing right.
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